Past Events

Cyber Security Event: Your Data, Our Money

Cyber Security Event: Your Data, Our Money

Thank you for attending our informative panel on hot topics involving your data privacy.

From deceptive online ads and privacy policies to how to protect your ISP search history and how to position yourself for a career in the Cyber Security / Data Privacy field, this was an excellent discussion!

Featuring:

  • Matthew Wernz, Federal Trade Commission
  • Elizabeth De Armond, Chicago-Kent Professor
  • Aaron Charfoos, Litigation Attorney at DYKEMA

When and Where:

Wednesday, April 12 at 3:15p

Chicago-Kent College of Law (565 W. Adams St., Chicago, IL– Room 510)

Hosted By:

The Cyber Security and Data Privacy Society at Chicago-Kent College of Law

Defending Our Data: Privacy, Security, And The Wave Of Data Breaches

Defending Our Data: Privacy, Security, And The Wave Of Data Breaches

Free Conference: Friday, April 7, 2017

Friday, April 7 | 9:30am – 4:30pm

Ogilvie Auditorium, Chicago-Kent College of Law

Data breaches happen at the rate of over two a day and anyone can be a victim. The aggregate social cost is extremely high—not just because of the quantifiable cost to the organizations but also because of the loss of individuals’ privacy, instances of identity theft, and the increased sense of insecurity. Security experts have long explained how to defend better. So why do we still live with a large loss that we have the means to avoid? One reason is that current laws are ineffective. Laws—current and proposed—impose requirements aimed at improving information security. They typically require ‘reasonable’ or ‘appropriate’ security measures, but they provide little or no further guidance. The unending wave of data breaches reveals the inadequacy of the current legal regimes. At the Defending our Data Conference, the participants addressed these issues and more!

This program was eligible for 4.75 hours of general IL MCLE credit.

The conference was free and open to the public.

Conference Materials:

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39th Annual Kenneth M. Piper Lecture: The Monitored Workplace

39th Annual Kenneth M. Piper Lecture: The Monitored Workplace

Robert Sprague
Robert Sprague, Professor of Legal Studies in Business, University of Wyoming

Robert Sprague, Professor of Legal Studies in Business, University of Wyoming was the lecturer for the 2017 Kenneth M. Piper Lecture, “Smartphones and Fitbits: Wither Privacy in the Workplace?”  

In this lecture, Professor Sprague examined new ways in which employers can monitor the activities of their employees and their potential impact on worker privacy. Two experts provided commentary on the lecture.

This program was eligible for 1.25 hours of general IL MCLE credit.

  • Date: Tuesday, April 4 | 11:30am-1:00pm
  • Location: Ogilvie Auditorium, Chicago-Kent College of Law
  • Tickets: The lecture is free and open to the public, but registration is requested.

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Beyond Bitcoin: Privacy, Money, Crime and a Better Digital Currency

Beyond Bitcoin: Privacy, Money, Crime and a Better Digital Currency

The National Aten Coin Foundation and Chicago-Kent College of Law hosted the Aten Coin 2016 Conference, “Beyond Bitcoin: Privacy, Money, Crime and a Better Digital Currency.”

The Bitcoin competitor Aten Coin describes itself as “the next generation digital currency that utilizes proprietary techniques to verify ownership of coin holders, monitor secured transactions, identify senders and receivers, maintain transparency over record-keeping process, protect coins from theft.” What Aten Coin offers is good for controlling money laundering, but can raise concerns about privacy. The conflict reflects the dual nature of financial regulation. Anti-money-laundering and counter-terrorism law require identifying parties in financial transactions and filing reports on suspicious activity, but privacy regulations restrict the disclosure of personally identifying information.

Can we realize the gains from digital currencies in a coherent system of regulation that respects privacy while also taking adequate steps to against money laundering and terrorism? The conference addressed this question and the effectiveness of Aten Coin in providing a solution.

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Exposed: Privacy, Security, and the Smart City

Exposed: Privacy, Security, and the Smart City

This one-day conference focused on the privacy issues created by the ubiquitous surveillance of smart cities.

Chicago is leading the way in becoming a “smart” city, a city that tracks traffic, movement, energy use, cell phones and the like to run more efficiently. Privacy is the price. To live in the smart city is to live exposed. What will the exposed life be like? Can we find a balance between privacy rights and the benefits of massive data collection? What control should we have over our information? What roles should technology and the law play?

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Health on the Go: Medical Apps, Privacy, and Liability

Health on the Go: Medical Apps, Privacy, and Liability

Five hundred million people will use a health app by 2015 and the use of health apps will increase by 25% yearly. But what are the privacy and legal implications of Health on the Go?

About the Conference

The digital world presents new opportunities to improve your health. It’s now possible for your every movement, every intonation in your voice, every phone call you dial or receive, and every website you visit to be tracked, documented and analyzed to create your health profile. From maximizing your personal health and identifying public health trends to fueling a new sector of the economy, health information from apps, social networks and games is shaping our lives. And as our digital health data grow, the need to address the legal, medical and social implications becomes increasingly important.

On Friday, April 4, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law in partnership with UIC School of Public Health brought together medical app developers, lawyers, regulators and health care professionals to discuss privacy and policy considerations for a public increasingly dependent on “Health on the Go.” The conference discussed the laws and regulations dealing with the collection and use of health information outside the health care system. It also addressed current federal and state investigations into data aggregation and medical apps.

Conference Materials

Under Watchful Eyes: The Technologies That Track

Under Watchful Eyes: The Technologies That Track

“Location, location, location.” No, not real estate—data. Location tracking technologies will soon be pervasive. Businesses and governments can use the technologies to follow your every move, to know when you leave your house, what route you take, for how long, and where you stop; it will be possible to record what you look at in a store, for how long, when and how, and where you eat lunch and what you order, how long you linger at the coffee machine, what desks and offices you frequent at work, and on and so on. As one data analyst put it,

“We can determine where you work, how you spend your time, and with whom, and with 87% certainty where you’ll be next Thursday at 5:35 p.m.”

This conference analyzed how decisions about the balance between privacy and benefits of information processing are made and how they should be made. It  examinee the control we do and should have over our information, and the extent to which could and should use technology and the law to gain greater control.

Experts participate in three panel discussions:

  1. The Present and the Future examines how tracking technologies are used and will be used in the future.
  2.  Reaping the Benefits, Respecting Privacy considers how we can design geo-location technologies and business models to ensure sufficient respect for privacy; the session will consider what counts as “sufficient respect for privacy.”
  3. What Is The Right Legal Regime? examines how the law should best respond to the need to protect privacy while realizing the benefits of tracking technologies.

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Conference on Internet Privacy, Social Networks and Data Aggregation

Conference on Internet Privacy, Social Networks and Data Aggregation

How many things did you reveal about yourself online today? Your opinion of a colleague? Your credit card number? Your photos from last night? These activities are all common ones, but where does the information we post—even on what seem to be the most private or friendly of forums—truly go?

In the wake of President Obama’s proposal for a Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights for the Digital Age, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law presented a national conference on Internet Privacy, Social Networks and Data Aggregation.The audience heard  from leaders in the field who discussed how social networks blur the lines between socializing and advertising, how data is collected and used, what legal remedies have been most effective and what the future holds for consumers, companies and the courts.

Conference Materials